I didn't have a clue that I should keep clean my make up sponges and even the one I keep in the powder. I usually just throw them away and buy a new one when they're really dirty wich is a good idea too I guess. So thanks for that ¿How should I wash my make up items? ¿Soap and water?

Asked by
grel

Yeah buying new sponges for your powders is the best idea honestly — they are really cheap so why not! However, it’s ok to wash them too, especially if you accidentally bought the wrong shape/size sponges…which I’ve done before. Ok, so I will introduce you to the land of sanitary and hygienic makeup products. Hold my hand: 

  • To clean makeup brushes: There are a bunch of different ways to do this, you can use homemade concoctions (there are plenty of youtube videos on this, I like this one best because I <3 Marlena), but I prefer to use Parian Spirit on my brushes. I have tried a bunch of different makeup brush cleaners spanning prices ranges, but this system is my favorite. Using the little grid with the tub with the brush cleanser ensures super clean brushes, and they dry very fast without drying out the brush hairs. You can also soak your makeup sponges in this. You want to also make sure you’re drying the brushes brush hairs down or at an angle where the water can drip out of them — if not, it’ll get stuck in the brush handle glue.  You can buy Brush Guards for this, but it’s not really necessary.
  • For sponges: You can use beautyblender cleanser specifically (also doubles as a brush cleaner), or your regular brush cleaner, or your face wash. I use plain ol’ Cetaphil and then spray it damp with some brush cleaner and let them dry. 

You might also want to sanitize your actual makeup once in awhile, even if you’re not using it on clients/other people. Just spraying down eyeshadows, lipsticks, powder things with some rubbing alcohol will do the job, and it won’t impact the quality of the products. 

Beauty Brand Marketing, Decoded.

Most of our questions are based on products — is so and so worth it? Will this break me out? The answers to these questions are usually individual experiences and we can only give you our personal experiences relating to them. However, we can give you tips on what product catch-all phrases to watch out for and keep in mind when you’re buying something.

  1. Patented or Patent Pending. Patents can be granted to companies that manufacture or combine materials in new ways.  But just because something is patented doesn’t mean it works. Patents are actually a really strange business themselves, and are quite easy to get — you can just buy one from a company. Here’s an interesting podcast all about the shady and strange world of patenting. 
  2. All Natural. This one really bugs me! It doesn’t mean the product is organic or chemical-free. After all, chemicals are “natural,” too. The reason “natural” products like honey and lemon work on your skin is a chemical one.
  3.  Organic. The US Department of Agriculture certifies organic food ingredients found in cosmetics, but not essential oils or plants used for cosmetic purposes.  To carry the USDA Organic seal, a product must contain at least 95% organic food ingredients. Other countries have their own organic certification labels, such as COSMOS and NaTrue in the European Union and NASAA in Australia.
  4. Hypoallergenic. Think this guarantees you won’t have a reaction? Think again. These products can still contain ingredients some people are allergic to, including preservatives and fragrance.
  5. Fragrance-Free. These products may not have a noticeable smell, but can still contain “masking” scents to cover up ingredients with unpleasant odors. Look for the words “no fragrance added” instead.
  6. Non-Comedogenic. While non-comedogenic products are usually oil-free and therefore less likely to cause breakouts, there’s no guarantee they won’t.  In fact, many contain dimethicone, a known acne aggravator.
  7.  Helps Pre-Mature Aging. Perhaps the most appealing of all claims from a consumer standpoint is this statement.  If a product truly prevented premature aging by affecting the structure of the skin, it would be classified as a drug and therefore would require FDA approval.  Manufactures circumvent this by utilizing the fact that sunscreens prevent premature aging by decreasing the damaging effects of ultraviolet light on the skin. Therefore, if a product contains sunscreen, it may state ‘prevents premature aging’ on the label.

These are all tips given to me by Dr. Michael Tick, a biochemist at The Institute for Skin Sciences, with some additions by myself. For more tips, feel free to go through our tips tag or send us asks! 

Hey, wondrous makeup princesses! I'm very very blonde - my lashes and brows don't show up at all. I love wearing lots of crazy, colourful, space-princess-y makeup, but I don't know how to make my brows show up tastefully to get their full dramatic potential. Dye? Makeups? Thanks!

Asked by
bloodmango

I actually think the no-brow look is super hot and space princessy (maybe I just have a big crush on Lizbeth Salander & the rest of the alien eyebrowed girl gang…..) but if you want visible eyebrows, of course filling them in will finish off your makeup very nicely. There are a few ways to do this: 

  1. Brow Pencils - This is a super easy way to do it, and there are plenty of options available. You’ll have to find a blonde color that matches you though — some are more red, or grey, etc, try a few. Anastasia has several choices for blonde. You’ll want a color that is a shade or two darker than your brows. MAC has of course, many shades of pencils as well. 
  2. Brow Powders - I use brow powder every day, even on days when I don’t feel like wearing anything else on my face. I don’t think you need to buy mid or high end for a good powder, you can use a matte eyeshadow that suits your eyebrows just as well. I use NYX Cake Powder exclusively. It comes in a bunch of different shades — from blonde to pure black — and you can mix, and it comes with a wax. 
  3. You can also consider brow gel (basically, it’s mascara) or a brow tint. Tints are nice for subtlety, but I don’t think there are many shades available. You can also use stencils & waxto shape your eyebrows. 

Here are some eyebrow related youtube videos I think might be helpful to you:

Hope that helps!

Goss dishes on the best full coverage foundations ever. He’s really killin it with helpful short videos lately (and by lately I really mean always).

hello there ! I bumped into your fashionpirate page today and I find that you keep very organized blogs. I am a fashion lover and I want to start a fashion blog , writing about my opinions and posting photos. Do you have any suggestion on how I can get started ? I am a little confused. WHERE DO ALL THE INSPIRATIONS OF YOUR BLOG COME FROM ?? and how do you management your time to do that ?

Asked by
idontutteraword

I’m pretty constantly researching and accumulating inspiration from everywhere so I have a lot of things to talk about and blog about and so I make time. I also don’t force myself into a schedule because I’m not blogging for other people or my readers (I luv ya’ll but you’re not the #1 priority of my life), I blog when I feel like I have something important to say and want to have something to look back on and understand myself a little more. So it’s not like blogging is a time consuming thing that gets in the way of my life at school or work or whatever. And actually, my work deals with blogging and the internet so it all pretty much ties in together nicely.

 I did a thing for Teen Vogue on Fashion Blogging Tips you might find useful (http://www.teenvogue.com/careers/fashion-careers/2011-07/blogger-tips) . IFB (http://heartifb.com) has a lot of useful information for people who are getting started at blogging too. But I don’t think blogging is very hard. You write about things you like, and you make it pretty to look at. The end. 

karlapowellmua:

My Top Tips for Doing Photography Eye Make-up
Yesterday I did a photo-shoot in London and I created a very bold midnight-blue smoky eye look which I tweeted out and put on my Facebook page. I had some lovely comments and feedback from the look I created and it got me thinking to do a blog post on some eye make-up photography tips which I know will be really useful for some of my followers.
Matte - Although shimmer can look great when applied properly like I have done in the inner corner of this look(above) if you are a little unsure about what to do, it’s always safe to go with matte colours as this can make the eye look, look washed out when the flash goes on the look.  Matte makeup won’t reflect light, making it easy to photograph.
Brows – I am HUGE fan on eyebrows and always fill them in my looks unless it is a bleached eye look I am specifically going for. The eyes and face will look so much more complete if brows are looking polished and the lighting will wash the brows out when pictures are being taken. Always use a powder product to fill brows in as the heat from the lights can melt cream products.
Colours- Makeup will always photograph two shades lighter! Makeup doesn’t translate as vibrant in photographs!
Powder - Even if the makeup look is applied perfectly, if your model looks shiny in pictures it can ruin the whole look and make more work for a retoucher to make the skin not look so shiny in the pictures. Once the makeup look is complete, use a finishing or setting powder to make everything more matte or oil blotting sheets are perfect! 
False lashes - 95% of my portfolio is full of all my models wearing false lashes, and they make all the difference suiting a variety of looks- natural, glam and creative and more!
I hope some of my top tips help you out in the future when you are working on photo-shoots.
Karla
X
High-res

karlapowellmua:

My Top Tips for Doing Photography Eye Make-up

Yesterday I did a photo-shoot in London and I created a very bold midnight-blue smoky eye look which I tweeted out and put on my Facebook page. I had some lovely comments and feedback from the look I created and it got me thinking to do a blog post on some eye make-up photography tips which I know will be really useful for some of my followers.

Matte - Although shimmer can look great when applied properly like I have done in the inner corner of this look(above) if you are a little unsure about what to do, it’s always safe to go with matte colours as this can make the eye look, look washed out when the flash goes on the look.  Matte makeup won’t reflect light, making it easy to photograph.

Brows – I am HUGE fan on eyebrows and always fill them in my looks unless it is a bleached eye look I am specifically going for. The eyes and face will look so much more complete if brows are looking polished and the lighting will wash the brows out when pictures are being taken. Always use a powder product to fill brows in as the heat from the lights can melt cream products.

Colours- Makeup will always photograph two shades lighter! Makeup doesn’t translate as vibrant in photographs!

Powder - Even if the makeup look is applied perfectly, if your model looks shiny in pictures it can ruin the whole look and make more work for a retoucher to make the skin not look so shiny in the pictures. Once the makeup look is complete, use a finishing or setting powder to make everything more matte or oil blotting sheets are perfect! 

False lashes - 95% of my portfolio is full of all my models wearing false lashes, and they make all the difference suiting a variety of looks- natural, glam and creative and more!

I hope some of my top tips help you out in the future when you are working on photo-shoots.

Karla

X

Sunscreen Protips

I’m reading this utterly fascinating book called The Original Beauty Bible in my free time and I highly recommend it! I’m learning so much. I thought I’d share you some relevant sunscreen/spf tips since it’s summer and it’s more important now than ever to know whats up. We’ve also been getting lots of sunscreen related questions.

  • SPF - Does SPF rating matter?  ”A sunscreen’s SPF rating is incredibly important, but it is not the only guide when you are buying sunscreens. All the SPF number lets you know is how long you can stay in the sun without burning while wearing that product. For example, let’s say you’re like me and you can stay in the sun for about 15 minutes before your skin starts to turn pink. Applying a sunscreen rated SPF 15 will allow you to stay in the sun 15 times longer (three and three-quarters hours: 15 times 15 minutes) without getting pink. In other words, the SPF number, 15 in this case, multiplied by the amount of time you can normally stay in the sun without getting pink, is how long you can stay in the sun after you’ve applied the sunscreen. If you normally can stay in the sun 25 minutes without getting pink, applying an SPF 15 sunscreen would let you stay in the sun six and one-quarter hours (15 times 25 equals 375 minutes) without burning.
  • SPF only refers to UVB Rays. You want UVA and UVB protection — because although UVB rays can’t penetrate glass and you won’t get a sunburn from them if you stay inside, UVA does penetrate, there are more of them, and they are more damaging because you deal with 100 times the amount of them as compared to UVB. 
  • Applying once is not enough.  "Research indicates sunscreen users are only applying 50% of the recommended amount, so they are only receiving 50% of the SPF protection." The reason why sunscreen directions usually say apply 20 minutes before you go out and reapply when when you sweat is because you’re probably not applying enough in the first place, and you need an ample amount and you need to apply often because you’ll have sweat some of it off. 
  • The more products you layer on over sunscreen, the less effective the sunscreen is. As a rule, it’s best to apply sunscreen over the rest of your skincare and makeup. Those other products might dilute or break down the products in your sunscreen if you apply them over it.
  • An SPF 5 Product over an SPF 10 product does not mean you are getting SPF 18 coverage. If you want SPF 15 (the minimum you should be wearing) find a product that offers that coverage specifically.

Back to the basics - Cleansing your skin.

makeuptips-:

So today is something a little different then the normal, we tend to forget about the importance of cleansing our skin so here’s a little refresher. One of the most basic rules when it comes to skincare is to remove your makeup before you hit the pillow at night, although basic, and although simple are people beginning to forget the importance of cleansing? Or are they just plain lazy? Here are the basic facts about why you need to be removing your makeup.

- Sleeping with your makeup on can clog the pores; resulting in acne and breakouts.

- Sleeping with your makeup on can cause skin irritations such as contact dermatitis, redness, eczema and lots of other nasty skin conditions.

- Most makeup contains pore clogging ingredients and other nasty chemicals, leaving them on for long periods of time is potentially dangerous to your skin, and your health.

- Sleeping in makeup which contains mineral oil (a petrol chemical) can increase skins photo sensitivity and cause acne (photo sensitivity is where you skin is more sensitive to the sun, shows up wrinkles quicker, absorbs more UVA/UVB rays)

- Most makeup contains some SPF even if it’s only a very small amount, and if your makeup didn’t contain your skincare you used to prep your makeup would.  normally at least one of the products you are using will contain SPF. SPF is normally Zinc oxide or Titanium dioxide based, when these products are on your skin the skin cannot properly repair itself alone, as these ingredients create a barrier.


- It can cause the skin to come under stress and produce excess oils.

- Your skin needs to be able to breathe.

- Skin needs to be replenished and packed full of nutrients and moisture at the end of each day as it is subject to environmental damage.

- None of your serums, or moisturisers will work to their full potential if you’ve got a layer of makeup between them.

- Wrinkles.



What do you think of this post? Would you like to see more articles like this;taking you back to the basics?